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Teachings

Below are the teachings from our weekly Torah Studies.  If you would like to join us, please email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. so we can let you know where and when we meet.

Yitro (Jethro) Sh’mot/Ex. 18:1-20:23

Torah PortionYitro (Jethro) Sh’mot/Exodus 18:1-20:23

Haftorah Reading: Isaiah 6:1-7:6; 9:5-6

Today we look at the Torah portion of Yitro/Jethro. This portion was named after the father in law of Moshe. It contains many things that could occupy pages of discussion. However, I will only deal with a few of them today.

I want to begin with my question about Shavuot or the holiday of weeks. This holiday happens on the fiftieth day counting from the first day of Passover. I know we have covered this more than once but I believe it is worthwhile to go over it again, lest we forget from where our faith came.

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B’Shallach (After He Had Let Go) Sh’mot/Exodus 13:17-17:16

Torah PortionB’Shallach (After He Had Let Go) Sh’mot/Exodus 13:17-17:16

Haftorah Reading: Judges 4:4-5:31

 

Today we read of the people of Israel being freed from Egypt and slavery after living four hundred years as slaves to Pharaoh. If I had to put a title to this section it might be, “Change and Transformation.” I want us, as we study today, to look at our own life in light of what we talk about.

 

In our opening verse Exodus 13:17 we read, “And it came to pass, when Pharaoh had let the people go, that G-d led them not through the way of the land of the Philistines, although that was near; for G-d said, ‘Lest perhaps the people repent when they see war and they return to Egypt.”

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Bo (Come) Ex. (Sh’mot) 10:1-13:16

Torah PortionBo (Come) Ex. (Sh’mot) 10:1-13:16

This  week we read the culmination of the plagues and the instructions for the ritual of Passover. I have a few things to share with you today. All of which should give us a deeper understanding of G-d’s will and plan for our daily life.

I would like to begin by mentioning something we have talked about before but is also something we need to hear again, especially in our world today. In almost all English translations of the Hebrew scriptures, the word translated in the opening sentence of this Torah portion of Bo is go. It could be more easily translated as come. Today in Israel you hear this word used often by mothers or fathers when they call their children to come to them. Every time it is used to tell the child to come to them or to come to where they are waiting for them.

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